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Enterprise Capability Development for Health Analytics

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I was asked by the folks at Corinium Global Intelligence to give a keynote address and participate in a discussion panel at their Chief Data and Analytics Officer Winter Event. It was a great opportunity to provide a little more context behind our strategy of shifting from a project to capability-based approach to analytics application. I tried to weave in a few case studies just so people could see how some of this is actually applied as well.

It was interesting to note the commonalities that are emerging between health care and other industries as it attempts to develop these new business capabilities. Though healthcare’s understanding of how to develop and operate advanced analytics “at scale” is immature compared to, for example, it’s competencies around descriptive statistics in areas like quality measures, the market is evolving rapidly.

Corinium was kind enough to post a copy of the slides to LinkedIn, so I thought I would share the presentation with you as well.

UNC / Duke Seminar: Making Medicine Smarter Through Analytics and Data Science

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UNC, Duke, and other universities in our state have a joint Health Informatics Research Seminar series, and they were kind enough to ask me to come share some thoughts on the state of the health analytics industry. You can see a recording of the talk titled Making Medicine Smarter Through Analytics and Data Sciences by clicking the seminar broadcast link.

The Road to High Performance Medicine

Medical Informatics World asked me to deliver a keynote address on how analytics are evolving within the health and life sciences markets. They were nice enough to record the talk and post it to YouTube, so I’ve provided the link here. If you’d like to see the slides and hear the accompanying talk track in more detail, I’ve posted a slide recording to YouTube as well. The basic question I’m intending to address is whether medicine truly become a performance-driven industry.? The complexity residing at the intersection between the science of medicine, the delivery of health care services, and natural patient variation has made it difficult to scale organizational performance beyond the effectiveness of individual contributors. Yet other fields such as space exploration, battlefield operations, meteorology, financial services, and automotive racing have demonstrated that comparably complex systems can be characterized and even managed to very high levels of performance. By adopting similar capabilities in the context of population health, accountable care, and personalized medicine, my premise is that health and life sciences organizations can unlock a new era of clinical, financial, and operational high performance.

I also delivered a separate talk on enterprise architecture, which I will post separately later.  And I got the opportunity to share the stage with some of my favorite industry speakers during two panel discussions.

Medical Informatics World 2015 Final Panel. From left: Eric Glazer, Gowtham Rao, John Halamka, Stephen Warren, Jason Burke, and J.D. Whitlock. Image courtesy of Cambridge Healthtech Institute.

Medical Informatics World 2015 Final Panel. From left: Eric Glazer, Gowtham Rao, John Halamka, Stephen Warren, Jason Burke, and J.D. Whitlock. Image courtesy of Cambridge Healthtech Institute.

My Health Analytics Symposium Talk

This past summer, I was fortunate enough to be asked to deliver one of the keynote addresses at the first Health Analytics Symposium conference.  Afterwards, a number of people asked for copies of my materials, which I’m fine to provide except no one ever knows what I said around each slide, and the slides themselves are far from self-explanatory.  So I managed to get a partial recording of my presentation, and have posted it here for those that might be interested.  Note that some of this content will be in my upcoming book on health analytics. More on that later.